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Using Trusts as a Designated Beneficiary of an IRA

Almost every estate planning client has some form of a retirement account, either a DBP, PSP, 401k, and/or an IRA. And in a lot of cases, it is the client's largest asset, other than the house. The client may want to control the distributions after his or her death. In this program, we will walk you through the analysis and process needed to pay the proceeds into a trust.

 

1 Hour MCLE Credit, including 1 Hour Specialization in Estate Planning

 

This program is co-sponsored by Golden Gate University.

Almost every estate planning client has some form of a retirement account, either a DBP, PSP, 401k, and/or an IRA. And in a lot of cases, it is the client's largest asset, other than the house.

Based on your facts, the client may want to control the distributions after his or her death, either because it is a second marriage and she or he does not want this asset paid outright to the surviving spouse who may then name unrelated third parties as subsequent beneficiaries—or the client is a single person with minor children and it is not prudent to name the children as direct beneficiaries because of their young age.

You have an "aha" moment and start thinking that the proceeds need to be paid into a trust BUT this sends a shudder down your spine—how do I do that?

The financial advisor keeps talking about how important it is to have a "Stretch IRA." Again you shudder—what is that?

Have no fear. We will walk you through the analysis and process and answer the above and the following questions:

  • What is a Stretch IRA, do I need one and if so, and how do I get one?
  • When must required minimum distributions (RMDs) begin?
  • Over what period of time are RMDs paid?
  • What is a Designated Beneficiary and do I have one?
  • What is the difference between a see-through trust, a conduit trust and an accumulation trust and when do I use each one?
  • Do I need to worry about remainder beneficiaries?
  • What if I have a charity as a beneficiary?
  • What do I do about the Roth IRA?

This program is co-sponsored by Golden Gate University.

This is an intermediate level course. Some estate planning experience is presumed.

On Demand ES55608-191

Live program recorded on Feb 28, 2018. 

 

If you are signed in and a CLE Passport holder, your adjusted cost appears below.

$ 79.00

Almost every estate planning client has some form of a retirement account, either a DBP, PSP, 401k, and/or an IRA. And in a lot of cases, it is the client's largest asset, other than the house.

Based on your facts, the client may want to control the distributions after his or her death, either because it is a second marriage and she or he does not want this asset paid outright to the surviving spouse who may then name unrelated third parties as subsequent beneficiaries—or the client is a single person with minor children and it is not prudent to name the children as direct beneficiaries because of their young age.

You have an "aha" moment and start thinking that the proceeds need to be paid into a trust BUT this sends a shudder down your spine—how do I do that?

The financial advisor keeps talking about how important it is to have a "Stretch IRA." Again you shudder—what is that?

Have no fear. We will walk you through the analysis and process and answer the above and the following questions:

  • What is a Stretch IRA, do I need one and if so, and how do I get one?
  • When must required minimum distributions (RMDs) begin?
  • Over what period of time are RMDs paid?
  • What is a Designated Beneficiary and do I have one?
  • What is the difference between a see-through trust, a conduit trust and an accumulation trust and when do I use each one?
  • Do I need to worry about remainder beneficiaries?
  • What if I have a charity as a beneficiary?
  • What do I do about the Roth IRA?

This program is co-sponsored by Golden Gate University.

This is an intermediate level course. Some estate planning experience is presumed.

HARRY B. MARING

HARRY B. MARING

HARRY B. MARING is the principal of The Maring Law Firm in San Francisco and has been in private practice for over 35 years, focusing on estate and gift tax planning as well as tax, corporate, and business planning for individuals and entities. He is a Certified as a Specialist in Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law by The State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. Mr. Maring is a Visiting Associate Professor of Law and Director of the LLM Taxation and Estate Planning Programs, at Golden Gate University School of Law. He is an Adjunct Professor to the Graduate Tax Law Program of Golden Gate University School of Law where he teaches Estate Planning for the Blended Family. Mr. Maring is also an Adjunct Professor to Hastings College of the Law where he teaches the Estate Planning course. He received his LL.M. degree in Taxation from New York University School of Law, his J.D. from Cumberland School of Law, and his B.A. in History from Vanderbilt University.

Products specifications
PRODUCT GROUP CLE
PRODUCT GROUP Digital
MCLE HOUR 0.5 - 2
PRACTICE AREA Estate Planning
Products specifications
PRODUCT GROUP CLE
PRODUCT GROUP Digital
MCLE HOUR 0.5 - 2
PRACTICE AREA Estate Planning